Mainstream Meditation

Science continues to validate the benefits of meditation on our health and well-being.  It is only natural that the mainstream start to cash in on the slow but steady shift in consciousness that is taking place globally.  Recently, The Huffington Post started a section in their news area called “The Third Metric:  Redefining Success Beyond Money & Power”.  They feel that the world has become too Yang, or Male-energy oriented, indicating that we are all out of balance.

 

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According to HuffPost,

The current, male-dominated model of success — which equates success with burnout, sleep deprivation, and driving ourselves into the ground — isn’t working for women, and it’s not working for men, either. On June 6, Arianna Huffington and Mika Brzezinski hosted a conference called “The Third Metric: Redefining Success Beyond Money & Power,” bringing together women — and a few good men — to focus on redefining success to include well-being, wisdom, our ability to wonder and our ability to make a difference in the world. On this page, HuffPost will host an ongoing conversation about The Third Metric and how we can chart a course to a new, more humane, more sustainable definition of success — for women and for men.

esq-chrishemsworthcover-0913-hJ1ou7-lgThe September, 2013 edition of Esquire is featuring a section entitled “How to Chill The F**k Out, which is suppose to include a handy how-to guide for meditation.

One thing is for sure and that is all of the people who were considered “Fringe” or “New Age” for practicing meditation are finally getting validated by the mainstream.   The ironic part is that those who embraced mindful and meditative methodologies could care less about being validated.  They are just ahead of the curve…

Meditation may help curb smoking habit | Features | The Malay Mail Online

articlesMeditation may help curb smoking habit | Features | The Malay Mail Online.

 

NEW YORK, Aug 12 — If you’re trying to snuff out a nicotine habit, a small new study suggests that meditation could help.

A US study announced yesterday and published last week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that after a few hours of meditation, smokers puffed significantly less and showed increased activity in areas of the brain associated with self-control.